fixed-dye:

Code: #4B4D6B

fixed-dye:

Code: #4B4D6B

neurosciencestuff:

Neural Anatomy of Primary Visual Cortex Limits Visual Working Memory
Despite the immense processing power of the human brain, working memory storage is severely limited, and the neuroanatomical basis of these limitations has remained elusive. Here, we show that the stable storage limits of visual working memory for over 9 s are bound by the precise gray matter volume of primary visual cortex (V1), defined by fMRI retinotopic mapping. Individuals with a bigger V1 tended to have greater visual working memory storage. This relationship was present independently for both surface size and thickness of V1 but absent in V2, V3 and for non-visual working memory measures. Additional whole-brain analyses confirmed the specificity of the relationship to V1. Our findings indicate that the size of primary visual cortex plays a critical role in limiting what we can hold in mind, acting like a gatekeeper in constraining the richness of working mental function.
Full Article
(Image: Shutterstock)

neurosciencestuff:

Neural Anatomy of Primary Visual Cortex Limits Visual Working Memory

Despite the immense processing power of the human brain, working memory storage is severely limited, and the neuroanatomical basis of these limitations has remained elusive. Here, we show that the stable storage limits of visual working memory for over 9 s are bound by the precise gray matter volume of primary visual cortex (V1), defined by fMRI retinotopic mapping. Individuals with a bigger V1 tended to have greater visual working memory storage. This relationship was present independently for both surface size and thickness of V1 but absent in V2, V3 and for non-visual working memory measures. Additional whole-brain analyses confirmed the specificity of the relationship to V1. Our findings indicate that the size of primary visual cortex plays a critical role in limiting what we can hold in mind, acting like a gatekeeper in constraining the richness of working mental function.

Full Article

(Image: Shutterstock)

 tagged:

#science

#science!!!

thesocietypages-blog:

Isn’t it ironic that “much of our ‘independence,’ where it exists, is made possible by supports and resources that have been provided by others”? In an interview with the Washington Post, Oregon State’s Richard A. Settersten, Jr. calls attention to one important instance of this irony: the rigid tie between the “independence” of young people and leaving the home. For Settersten, Jr., common (and paranoid) misunderstandings about “permanent” and “alarming” generational trends in living at home are problematic not simply because they are inaccurate, but because they point to a misguided ideal of “independence.”

To clarify how patterns in young adult living arrangements have varied over time, he notes:

This isn’t new. If we look back over the last century, we can see that the rush out of the parental home was a post-World War II phenomenon, and proportions have been growing since 1970…. What’s remarkable about the early adult years today is not that young people live with parents but that they live without a spouse…. Marriage and parenting now culminate the process of becoming adult rather than start it.

Settersten, Jr. also clarifies who chooses to live at home and why. He indicates that men of every age group are more likely to live with parents, mentioning their higher rates of dropping out of school
unemployment, and a higher average age of marriage as possible reasons why. Individuals of disadvantaged groups also tend to live at home at greater rates—possibly because they are more likely to live in high-cost metropolitan areas or because young people in their culture are expected to contribute to family resources. Moreover, according to Settersten, Jr.,

For many families, living at home is a strategic choice that permits young adults to attend or reduce the cost of higher education, take internships, or create a nest egg. (It may also be necessary for paying down student loans.) For them, it’s not about being locked out of the labor market, but about building a more secure economic future.

So before tossing aside the “boomerang generation” as hopelessly dependent “failures to launch,” consider how peculiar it is “that we expect young people to somehow strive for complete independence when those of us who are no longer young realize that adult life is heavily conditioned by relationships with other people.” Settersten, Jr. has a point.

To learn how this notion of independence is affecting older adults, check out Stacy Torres’s article on Families as They Really Are.

For a different take on the role of the economy in millenials’ living arrangements, see this article by Lisa Wade.

If you’re a teacher, here’s a great lesson by Kia Heise to start a class conversation about living alone as a ‘rite of passage’ into adulthood.

Me: hm hm
Dad: ni
The first time it was an ear, nose and throat doctor. I had an emergency visit for an ear infection, which was causing a level of pain I hadn’t experienced since giving birth. He looked at the list of drugs I was taking for my bipolar disorder and closed my chart.

“I don’t feel comfortable prescribing anything,” he said. “Not with everything else you’re on.” He said it was probably safe to take Tylenol and politely but firmly indicated it was time for me to go. The next day my eardrum ruptured and I was left with minor but permanent hearing loss.

Another time I was lying on the examining table when a gastroenterologist I was seeing for the first time looked at my list of drugs and shook her finger in my face. “You better get yourself together psychologically,” she said, “or your stomach is never going to get any better.”

If you met me, you’d never know I was mentally ill. In fact, I’ve gone through most of my adult life without anyone ever knowing — except when I’ve had to reveal it to a doctor. And that revelation changes everything. It wipes clean the rest of my résumé, my education, my accomplishments, reduces me to a diagnosis.
 tagged:

#mental illness

#medicine

fromquarkstoquasars:

Astronomy Photo of the Day (APotD): 8/31/14 — The Center of the Lagoon Nebula
The Lagoon nebula,which can be found about 5,000 light years from Earth, toward the constellation of Sagittarius, is one of the most memorable nebulae in this galaxy.. Perhaps this image helps explains the “why.”Here, we stare straight into the heart of this stellar nursery, seeing various nebulae-driving-mechanisms at work.
Learn all about them here: http://bit.ly/1ueXfbL
Image Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, NASA, ESA - Processing & Licence: Judy Schmidt

fromquarkstoquasars:

Astronomy Photo of the Day (APotD): 8/31/14 — The Center of the Lagoon Nebula

The Lagoon nebula,which can be found about 5,000 light years from Earth, toward the constellation of Sagittarius, is one of the most memorable nebulae in this galaxy.. Perhaps this image helps explains the “why.”Here, we stare straight into the heart of this stellar nursery, seeing various nebulae-driving-mechanisms at work.

Learn all about them here: http://bit.ly/1ueXfbL

Image Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, NASA, ESA - Processing & Licence: Judy Schmidt

 tagged:

#space

#astronomy

fixed-dye:

Code: #CA9375

fixed-dye:

Code: #CA9375

ohstarstuff:

Yer a Wizard, Nebula
Located only 8,000 light years away, the Wizard nebula, surrounds developing open star cluster NGC 7380. Visually, the interplay of stars, gas, and dust has created a shape that appears to some like a medieval sorcerer which spans about 100 light years. Astronomers expect that the nebula may only last a few million years, although some of the stars being formed may outlive our Sun.
(Image Credit: J-P Metsavainio)

ohstarstuff:

Yer a Wizard, Nebula

Located only 8,000 light years away, the Wizard nebula, surrounds developing open star cluster NGC 7380. Visually, the interplay of stars, gas, and dust has created a shape that appears to some like a medieval sorcerer which spans about 100 light years. Astronomers expect that the nebula may only last a few million years, although some of the stars being formed may outlive our Sun.

(Image Credit: J-P Metsavainio)

 tagged:

#space

#astronomy

abandonedography:

Perkasie Abandoned Train Tunnel

abandonedography:

Perkasie Abandoned Train Tunnel

touhoupics:

Koishi by the window. By yoshioka yoshiko.

touhoupics:

Koishi by the window. By yoshioka yoshiko.

 tagged:

#touhou project

#fanart

fixed-dye:

Code: #549995

fixed-dye:

Code: #549995

fixed-dye:

Code: #CAD3C7

fixed-dye:

Code: #CAD3C7

 tagged:

#katanagatari

#animation

You can't cross the sea on such thin wings.
 tagged:

#ping pong